Genesis 1:1-10

1In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.

2And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.

3And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.

4And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

5And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.

6And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters.

7And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament: and it was so.

8And God called the firmament Heaven. And the evening and the morning were the second day.

9And God said, Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear: and it was so.

10And God called the dry land Earth; and the gathering together of the waters called he Seas: and God saw that it was good.

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About Genesis chapter 1 verse 1 to 10:

The Book of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek , meaning "origin"; Hebrew:"In [the] beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh) and the Christian Old Testament.

The basic narrative expresses the central theme: God creates the world (along with creating the first man and woman) and appoints man as his regent, but man proves disobedient and God destroys his world through the Flood. The flood has also been used in older religions, such as one of the oldest known appearance of the flood, The Cult of Ashur[further explanation needed], where the rainbow that Ashur creates is actually Ashur putting down his iconic bow on a weapon rack, showing that Ashur has stopped trying to destroy the world again.

The new post-Flood world is also corrupt. God does not destroy it, instead calling one man, Abraham, to be the seed of its salvation. At God's command Abraham descends from his home into the land of Canaan, given to him by God, where he dwells as a sojourner, as does his son Isaac and his grandson Jacob. Jacob's name is changed to Israel, and through the agency of his son Joseph, the children of Israel descend into Egypt, 70 people in all with their households, and God promises them a future of greatness. Genesis ends with Israel in Egypt, ready for the coming of Moses and the Exodus. The narrative is punctuated by a series of covenants with God, successively narrowing in scope from all mankind (the covenant with Noah) to a special relationship with one people alone (Abraham and his descendants through Isaac and Jacob).

Structure

Genesis appears to be structured around the recurring phrase elleh toledot, meaning "these are the generations," with the first use of the phrase referring to the "generations of heaven and earth" and the remainder marking individuals—Noah, the "sons of Noah", Shem, etc., down to Jacob. It is not clear, however, what this meant to the original authors, and most modern commentators divide it into two parts based on subject matter, a "primeval history" (chapters 1–11) and a "patriarchal history" (chapters 12–50). While the first is far shorter than the second, it sets out the basic themes and provides an interpretive key for understanding the entire book. The "primeval history" has a symmetrical structure hinging on chapters 6–9, the flood story, with the events before the flood mirrored by the events after. The "patriarchal history" recounts the events of the major patriarchs Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, to whom God reveals himself and to whom the promise of descendants and land is made, while the story of Joseph serves to take the Israelites into Egypt in preparation for the next book, Exodus.

Prayer of the Day

A Saturday Prayer for Faith and Fellowship


Father God,

Thank You for this Saturday. We come today with hearts so full of gladness and appreciation for the friends You have given us in this world. We know that the church is Your heart, and that You have called us to come together in unity to follow You.

Help us to reach out to and pour into others. By Your Holy Spirit, guide us so that we may bless those around us with the grace and love You so freely give to us.

Help us to live by the Golden Rule when it comes to others. Move in our hearts and lives, creating opportunities for us to connect with those we do not know in order to cultivate new relationships and tend to well established ones. Community is Your heart, Lord, and we pray today that You would move in our hearts so it becomes a great desire in our own natures as well.


In Jesus' name,

Amen.