Leviticus 1:1

1And the LORD called unto Moses, and spake unto him out of the tabernacle of the congregation, saying,

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About Leviticus chapter 1 verse 1:

The Book of Leviticus (from Greek, Leuitikon — from rabbinic Hebrew torat kohanim) is the third book of the Jewish Bible (Hebrew: Vayikra/Wayyiqr?) and of the Old Testament; its Hebrew name comes from its first word vayikra?,"He [God] called." The English name is from the Latin Leviticus, taken in turn from Greek and a reference to the Levites, the tribe of Aaron, from whom the Kohanim ("priests") descended. The book, however, addresses all the people of Israel (1:2) though some passages address the priests specifically (6:8). Most of its chapters (1–7, 11–27) consist of God's speeches to Moses which he is commanded to repeat to the Israelites. This takes place within the story of the Israelites' Exodus after they escaped Egypt and reached Mt. Sinai (Exodus 19:1). The Book of Exodus narrates how Moses led the Israelites in building the Tabernacle (Exodus 35–40) based on God's instructions (Exodus 25–31). Then in Leviticus, God tells the Israelites and their priests how to make offerings in the Tabernacle and how to conduct themselves while camped around the holy tent sanctuary. Leviticus takes place during the month or month-and-a-half between the completion of the Tabernacle (Exodus 40:17) and the Israelites' departure from Sinai (Numbers 1:1, 10:11).


Authorship

The traditional view is that Leviticus was compiled by Moses, or that the material in it goes back to his time, but internal clues suggest that the book developed much later in Israel's history and was completed either near the end of the Kingdom of Judah in the late seventh century BC or in the exilic and post-exilic period of the sixth and fifth centuries BC. Scholars debate whether it was written primarily for Jewish worship in exile that centered on reading or preaching,[3][4] or was aimed instead at worshipers at temples in Jerusalem and Samaria.[5] but they are practically unanimous that the book had a long period of growth, and that although it includes some material of considerable antiquity, it reached its present form in the Persian period (538–332 BC).

Prayer of the Day

Easter dinner prayer

Lord,

As we gather together as family and friends we invite you once again into our lives.
May the hope of your resurrection colour our days.
May the promise of your spirit working in us light up our lives.
May the love you revealed to us shape our giving.
May the truth in your word guide our journeys,
And may the joy of your kingdom fill our homes.

As we gather together underneath the banner of your life,
We thank you for all the wonderful food that we can now enjoy,
And celebrate your glorious resurrection.

Thank you Lord.

Amen.