Proverbs 1:1

1The proverbs of Solomon the son of David, king of Israel;

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About Proverbs chapter 1 verse 1:

The Book of Proverbs (Hebrew: ???????, Míshlê (Shlomoh), "Proverbs (of Solomon)") is the second book of the third section (called Writings) of the Hebrew Bible and a book of the Christian Old Testament. When translated into Greek and Latin, the title took on different forms: in the Greek Septuagint (LXX) it became ????????? Paroimiai ("Proverbs"); in the Latin Vulgate the title was Proverbia, from which the English name is derived.

Proverbs is not merely an anthology but a "collection of collections" relating to a pattern of life which lasted for more than a millennium. It is an example of the Biblical wisdom tradition, and raises questions of values, moral behaviour, the meaning of human life, and right conduct. The repeated theme is that "the fear of God (meaning submission to the will of God) is the beginning of wisdom". Wisdom is praised for her role in creation; God acquired her before all else, and through her he gave order to chaos; and since humans have life and prosperity by conforming to the order of creation, seeking wisdom is the essence and goal of the religious life.

Contents

"Proverbs" translates the Hebrew word mashal, but "mashal" has a wider range of meaning than the short catchy sayings implied by the English word. Thus, while roughly half the book is made up of "sayings" of this type, the other half is made up of longer poetic units of various types. These include "instructions" formulated as advice from a teacher or parent addressed to a student or child, dramatic personifications of both Wisdom and Folly, and the "words of the wise" sayings, longer than the Solomonic "sayings" but shorter and more diverse than the "instructions".

The first section (chapters 1–9) consists of an initial invitation to young men to take up the course of wisdom, ten "instructions", and five poems on personified Woman Wisdom. Proverbs 10:1–22:16, with 375 sayings, consists of two parts, the first contrasting the wise man and the fool (or the righteous and the wicked), the second addressing wise and foolish speech. Chapters 25–29, attributed to editorial activity of "the men of Hezekiah," contrasts the just and the wicked and broaches the topic of rich and poor. Chapter 30:1–4, the "sayings of Agur", introduces creation, divine power, and human ignorance.

Prayer of the Day

5 Reasons to Pray

Many times we complain that we do not know how to pray or why to pray. There are many reasons to approach God in prayer. But I would like to share with you this note about prayer.



1) To seek the face of the Lord and to know Him better (Psalm 27:8).

Psalm 27:8: When thou saidst, Seek ye my face, my heart hath answered thy face, Lord I will seek.

2) To remove your eyes from your problems and place them in the Lord (Psalm 121:1).

Psalm 121:1: I will lift up mine eyes unto the mountains; Where does my help come from?.

3) To speak with God (1 Peter 3:12).

1 Peter 3:12: For the eyes of the Lord are upon the righteous, and his ears are attentive to his prayers; But the face of the Lord is against those who do evil

4) To remove the burdens of your heart (Psalm 142:1-2)

Psalm 142:1-2:

1- I cry to the Lord with my voice; With my voice I beg the Lord.

2 - In front of him I expose my complaint; In his manifest presence my anguish.

5) That your petitions may be known by God (Matthew 21:22).

Matthew 21:22: And whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive.